The Blood of the Vampire (Valancourt Classics)

The Blood of the Vampire

Oh god this is so excellent. Granted, Marryat has her moments when the prose isn't sparkling "'The what,' said Elinor Leyton ungrammatically" springs to mind in particular , but it's an intriguing tale with a very interesting lead female character, and I don't know why more people haven't read this book. Please check it out!

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Much of the story is concerned with Harriet coming into her own as a member of society and trying to navigate the difficult world of upperclass Britain while finding love and happiness. Publisher to the Decadents: This is an okay little story even if it's a bit amateurish. She does leave awful things in her wake thanks to her cursed blood, but the novel is surprisingly sympathetic towards her. Penguin Red Classics Gothic.

Just the other day I was reminded of an essay about Fanny Price in which she is described as being an emotional vampire for sucking the life out of those around her. Now here I am reading The Blood of the Vampire and starting to think that there is something to that phrase, emotional vampire. Harriet seems to drain the life out of her companions just by her presence. This is an interesting take on vampirism and I'm excited to read more. Just finished this book and it is an interesting take on Va Just the other day I was reminded of an essay about Fanny Price in which she is described as being an emotional vampire for sucking the life out of those around her.

Just finished this book and it is an interesting take on Vampire mythology. I can only wonder how different Buffy and Twilight might have been if Florence Marryat's vampire had been the one adopted into pop culture history.

Blood of the Vampire: Review

There is no blood in this tale, at least not in the traditional horror genre way. The Blood here refers to inherited traits, genetics and the idea that blood will out. Harriet Brandt is a vampire. She sucks the life out of those around her, but she does it through her sheer emotional intensity.

The taint of her blood has to do with racial purity and Victorian morality. But yes, there is a bat. Sep 03, Muriel Schwenck rated it it was amazing. Harriet is an orphan, who is desparate for friendship and affection. She has an insensitive , sensual, selfish, greedy and needy nature.

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The Blood of the Vampire (Valancourt Classics) Paperback – June 4, This item:The Blood of the Vampire (Valancourt Classics) by Florence Marryat Paperback $ Marryat's vampire story was published in , the same year that Bram Stoker's Dracula appeared. prog40.ru: The Blood of the Vampire (Valancourt Classics) ( ) by Florence Marryat and a great selection of similar New.

Early in the book, there is a description of her eating so greedily in a restaurant, that one character describes her as "Feeding like a cormorant. She is blessed with great physical beauty and plenty of money. There are some descriptions of her background and early life which might seem racist, Harriet i Great melodrama. There are some descriptions of her background and early life which might seem racist, Harriet is pretty brutal in her own descriptions, and really shocks other people. It is not the races that are the problems, but what the individuals actually do that is the problem.

As the story progresses, racial things are not as important to the main characters. It is the supposed hereditary behavior which is the big problem. Is Harriet a psychological vampire with fatal effects? Or just a really high maintenance friend and girlfriend? Is the trail of fatalities she leaves in her wake a series of unfortunate coincidence or a sign of her literally fatal attraction?

The intro is full of psychology, feminist theory and such. Fine reading for additional ideas, but way too much input before reading this story for the first time. Just enjoy the novel first. Nov 14, Max rated it really liked it Shelves: This was a great book. Although the cover and title lead me to expect a horror story in the vein of the novel's contemporary, Dracula, The Blood of the Vampire is much more like a romance novel in the vein of Jane Austen with a supernatural horror element added in.

The protagonist, Harriet Brandt, is a psychic vampire who absorbs energy from the people she's closest too, and this does lead to a certain amount of horror, but it is not the entire focus of the plot. Much of the story is concerned w This was a great book. Much of the story is concerned with Harriet coming into her own as a member of society and trying to navigate the difficult world of upperclass Britain while finding love and happiness.

She does leave awful things in her wake thanks to her cursed blood, but the novel is surprisingly sympathetic towards her. The secondary characters are all quite well written and interesting. These include Margaret Pullen, a loving mother, her soon-to-be-sister-in-law Elinor Leyton, who's rather aloof for much of the novel, and the absolutely fascinating Baroness who is horrible and yet compelling. There are also fun male characters, especially the feminist, socialist, and all around forward-thinking Anthony Pennell. The romance in the novel is cute and well done, while the horror I felt at Harriet's inescapable condition was also quite deep and enjoyable.

Over all, I really enjoyed this book, and I hope that it will begin to be less obscure, since I think other people would like it as well.

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This novel was first published in — yes, the same year as Dracula. Readers may well find the poisonously racist views expressed by the old doctor, who, I think, is intended to be a fairly sympathetic character more chilling than the suggestions of vampirism and end up with a good deal of sympathy for the most unwilling vampire Harriet Brandt, with her sad heritage. Apart from her unfortunate tendency to cause the death of anyone she is fond of she is blamed by the other characters for havin This novel was first published in — yes, the same year as Dracula.

Apart from her unfortunate tendency to cause the death of anyone she is fond of she is blamed by the other characters for having a good appetite for food, and for being sexually attractive — and the author seems, implicitly, to be blaming her as well. Well worth reading as a companion to 'Dracula. Jun 25, Ereck rated it really liked it.

Brenda Hammack's historicist introduction and critical bibliography -- best read as an afterword, just as the initial footnote recommends-- are illuminating and balanced: Nov 11, Debra Manskey rated it really liked it. Wonderful Gothic vampire fiction that I re-read for uni. The language is a little dated but the tensions, class and gender distinctions are all to me well handled.

Highly recommended to anyone who's interested in genre fiction. Oct 07, Juliana rated it it was ok Shelves: Nov 08, Leaf Album rated it liked it. I was expecting something original but alas it fell into the typical gothic trope fest half way through. The first half was very good while falling flat toward the end.

Sad to see the author just cop out and say "well screw it let's just end this in the most gothic way possible. I just don't see myself ever reading this again. Dec 26, Charlotte rated it really liked it Shelves: This book was recommended to me by a lecturer last year and I have only just got around to reading it. The promise of supernatural elements was another practically guaranteed win for this novel.

The style was easy enough to read and enjoy, although Marryat's use of commas was frequently wrong and that disturbed the English student in me. I wouldn't say I agr This book was recommended to me by a lecturer last year and I have only just got around to reading it. I wouldn't say I agree with the blurb, which cites 'The Blood of the Vampire' as the "other vampire novel" of Aside from a few hints and superstitions, there is not one vampire in this book.

Granted, the plot is a subjective one and the reader is left to draw their own conclusions but there is absolutely no evidence of a supernatural sub-plot. Not to say that this prevented me from liking the novel. Harriet was a fascinating character, flawed and yet sympathetic. I also loved every other character in the novel, even Miss Leyton and the Baroness. The prickliness of their personalities made them uniquely human and added an authentic feel to the story.

I am glad I hunted this book down, even if it wasn't easy to find. Dec 06, Candice Lee rated it liked it. I am actually torn by this book. On one hand, it is a novel that is ahead of its time. It features themes of otherness, racism, genetic inheritance, loneliness, and sexism to name a few ideas. On the other hand, it is not daring enough, and its conclusion punishes and sacrifices a supposed "bad' girl to make some purportedly "poor but more deserving " good girl rich.

To put it concisely, this book is about slut-shaming more than anything else. I know that today we have discovered that sociopathy I am actually torn by this book. I know that today we have discovered that sociopathy is inheritable, but the main character is not a sociopath. She is not a rabid killer who wants blood and drains people to keep living.

She wants love which is seen as unnatural in the story even for an orphan who was walled up in a nunnery for ten years. Her passionate and blooming sexual nature, which would be considered demure these days, is vilified as are all displays of affection. The main character is as unaware of her power of attraction as she is of her parentage.

The type of persecution she suffers at the hands of the Doctor underlies every form of racism, sexism, homophobia and so on. This book promotes the idea of bad blood. A person may not mean to be bad. They just are born that way. We are right to not pity them and to stay away from them at all costs because look what happens when you befriend strangers who are not exactly like you: The only guy who is sympathetic to the cause of the poor and wants all people to be treated equally gets his for believing in human kind.

He wanted a passionate woman like himself, and got punished for it. Stay with the boring waters you are familiar with, this novel says. Marry boring girls without passion who treat you coldly and prudishly because they are safe. And for the girls, marry handsome, vain, flirty guys who have wandering eyes because one day they will learn to appreciate you Sure they will.

This book feels like an even more xenophobic rendition of "Jane Eyre. They felt so threatened by their ability to emote and be sexual they had to write many novels vilifying them and elevating themselves. This story was a trail breaker at its time for women authors, but I am not liking where the trail is leading.

It crushes one type of woman to raise up another. There seems to be good reasons for this book no longer being popular. Valancourt Classics Publisher Series by cover 1—8 of next show all. I am Jonathan Scrivener by Claude Houghton. The Animated Skeleton by Anonymous. Gothic Classics by Francis Lathom. Azemia Valancourt Classics by William Beckford. The Beetle by Richard Marsh. Between the Dark and the Daylight by Richard Marsh.

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The Blood of the Vampire by Florence Marryat (2009, Paperback)

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